Manual Focus Lenses on a Canon 60D – A Zuiko 200mm f4

This is the twelfth (and almost the last!) of a series of posts for photographers who want to try cheap but fast manual focus lenses on an APS-C DSLR. The subject of this mini review is the Zuiko 200mm f4, a 320mm equivalent on an APS-C DSLR and just a bit faster than a 75-300mm AF Canon zoom lens at the same focal length. This ones another on loan from Pete and Jayne – Pete apparently has a weakness for telephoto lenses.

_MG_8730s

The lens is easy to focus in bright light, and produces some excellent results using centre weighted metering mode.

The filter size is 55mm and the aperture range is f4 to f32 (not sure why f32 is needed but it’s nice to have). The focus rack goes from infinity to the minimum focus distance of 2.5 m in quite a bit more than 180 degrees.

_MG_8744s

Colours are on the cold side, but very acceptable. The contrast across the aperture range is good too, better than the 135 f2.8. The depth of field is obviously very narrow at 200mm at f4, and the bokeh is pretty good.

The built-in lens hood protects the front element from flare effectively, and makes me wonder why they aren’t built into all lenses.

_MG_8889s

In bright light there’s not much chromatic aberration (purple on the left top of the sign), and telephoto compression is starting to get very pronounced.

_MG_8742s

More very soft bokeh and sharpness of in focus areas – this is excellent.

Physically the lens is made to an exceptionally high standard – light weight and all metal with a real quality feel to it. It ‘fits’ the 60D really well, the generous focus ring is smooth – all pretty much perfect.

IMG_0118

The lens mount adaptor is the very well made made Fotodiox EF to OM.

A great MF lens then, and highly recommended? Like the 135mm f2.8, a qualified yes. F4 is only 2/3 of a stop faster than a normal tele zoom lens so there’s no real aperture speed advantage. Focussing in dull light is at best ‘hit and miss’ on the standard 60D focussing screen even for stationary subjects – let alone moving ones. As sports and nature photography are this lenses’ home territory this is unfortunate.

The negatives aren’t about the lens itself, which is truly excellent, rather about using medium telephoto MF lenses on DSLR. I’m a bit sceptical about the need for AF up to around 85mm where the speed of equivalent MF lenses make focussing easy. As the max apertures drop to f2.8 at 135mm, and f4 at 200mm, the focussing screens get darker, and the focussing becomes progressively more critical – two unavoidable principles of optical design. As a consequence, AF comes into its own at longer focal lengths, as well as IS.

For me the ‘break point’ is 135mm. I took loads of shots for this test, but those taken on overcast days weren’t that good – though that might be just me!

In conclusion then, if you’re determined to use one or have one lying around give it a try but be aware that focussing on anything other than a sunny day may be a problem. If you’re not that determined, I’d suggest instead a modern AF lens – the Canon EF 70-300mm is a good all-rounder, even if the build quality doesn’t come close to these superbly built old Zuikos. A final alternative, even if it is a very heavy one, is the Vivitar 70-210 f3.5 macro, which is a bit easier to focus, and has a very nice macro mode too.

These lenses are relatively rare on the second-hand market varying between £90 and £150 (there’s a cheaper f5 version too).

Thanks for looking – hope you find this useful!

If you’re interested in using other MF lenses on your DSLR have a look at the other reviews on the film, camera and lens review index tab.

To see how this – and virtually every other known Zuiko lens known to man – performs on four thirds and micro four thirds sensors have a look here – an excellent series of tests at biofos.com!

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