Manual Focus Lenses on a Canon 60D – A Zuiko 28mm f2

This is the second of a detailed series of posts for photographers who are thinking of using relatively cheap old manual focus lenses on an APS-C DSLR. This time it’s the Zuiko 28mm f2, my favourite lens on 35mm SLRs (hence the name of this blog), which sometimes graces the Canon 60D when it’s very lucky as a fast standard lens.

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What it’s capable of in bright conditions at f8 – sharp, superb colour and saturation. This was take on an Olympus 620.

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Same boat from the front – so sharp it hurts!

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On a very dull day – depth of field at f2 at close focus distance. Not much room for error but easy to focus!

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Close up at f2 – the mill (see below) is in the background. The rendition of out of focus areas is very pleasing – the bright edge on the out of focus verticals (just behind the snowdrops) disappears at smaller apertures. The Sweet 35 Lensbaby does the same thing.

It’s effective focal length on a crop frame is around 45mm, the aperture range is f2 to f16 and its minimum focus distance is just less than 30cm. To improve close distance photography it uses ‘floating lens elements’ which move to compensate for near distance abberations- unusual in a lens of this age. Filter size is a standard 49mm.

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In use – nicely balanced – like the previously reviewed 17mm Vivitar lens, it’s all metal and quite heavy. The focus throw is short and smooth. All in all – lovely!

On to some proper tests – all test shots on an 18MP Canon 60D at ISO 200 and Olympus OM mount lenses using a Fotodiox adaptor. Images were taken in centre weighted metering mode, saved in RAW and converted to JPG with default settings in Canon’s DPP software. The only tweak was to the white balance – the 60D was in auto WB mode and the shots had a very blue cast – corrected in DPP.

So – the test and it’s back to the Mill which has become a test standard :-

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A dull day with not much light, so something of a challenge in the contrast department. Given the conditions, nice contrast, colour and sharpness.

Starting at f2 – wide open and more of the ‘sheen’ seen in the 17mm lens test caused by light bouncing around the mirror box. Not bad but there’s a bit of soft purple chromatic aberration in the centre shot. These are huge enlargements from the frame though and these faults wouldn’t be seen on a 10×8 inch print – or larger probably. Nit picking!

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f4 – The ‘sheen’ has gone – edge slightly softer (strange) and centre as sharp as it’s going to get.f4

f8 – out resolving the sensor I’d say …f8

f16 – some softening in the centre again but the edge is fine.

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Chromatic aberration – other than some soft purple and blue CA at f2, there isn’t much at all, maybe a few pixels at most.

All in all, this is a bit of a special lens, and I’m very lucky to have one having bought it for my OM system 20 years ago. To be honest, buying one second-hand is quite expensive and doesn’t make that much sense, when Canon make an AF 50mm 1.4 for around the same price – I’ve seen mint condition ones go for £300. If you come across one for less or get the chance to ‘inherit’ one from someone – snap it up!

In summary then – at f2 it’s two stops faster than a standard zoom and pretty good. At f5.6 to f8 the resolution is as good as it gets.

There are f2.8 and f3.5 versions which are much cheaper but I’m afraid I haven’t ever used them – but I know where I can borrow one!

To see how this – and virtually every other known Zuiko lens known to man – performs on four thirds and micro four thirds sensors have a look here – an excellent series of tests at biofos.com!

Thanks for looking – hope you find this useful.

If you’re interested in using other MF lenses on your DSLR have a look at the other reviews on the film, camera and lens review index tab.

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