Grain at Last! Ilford Delta 3200 in Rodinal.

Or alternatively (suggested by Nick in the previous post’s comment section) ‘The Search for the Holy Grain’.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Worbarrow Bay with Portland just visible on the horizon on the left. I thought this very heavy grain may be caused by under/over exposure but the negative looks fine.

In an attempt to get some really grainy results I’ve been trying some faster films with little success – I want a really grainy image like those obtainable using now discontinued films such as Kodak TMax 3200, Scotch 3M 1000 or even Kodak Hi Speed IR.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

The central portion of the above shot. That’s a lot of grain… I was after grain but maybe a bit less than this!

At 1600 and 3200 ASA Ilford Delta 3200 is (annoyingly) very well-behaved when developed in ID11, so the next step is Rodinal which sharpens up detail at the expense of harder grain.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Tyneham church entrance. The sky has overexposed – as I took a meter reading from the ground here – and the grain hasn’t shown on the scan. Interesting.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

The centre of the previous shot – grainy goodness in spadefulls!

All shots from one roll in an OM2N using a 17mm f3.5 lens in manual mode as the max ASA setting is 1600 – so set the exposure and take a stop off. The Rodinal was at a 1+25 dilution at 20 degrees c for 11 minutes.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Centre weighted meter reading and some grain in the sky as it hasn’t overexposed. This is just about right.

The grain is most evident in skies when no exposure compensation has been set for the main subject. If a meter reading is taken from the ground (rather than the whole scene) the clouds become over exposed and the grain can’t be seen – so a choice of technique.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

On a fairly bright winter’s day exposures are possible at 3200 using 1/1000th of a second and f16 to f11. On a brighter day a red 25A or polarizer would be needed – unless your SLR can shoot faster than 1/1000th of a second or you lens run to f22/f32 of course.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Sorry – another shot of the same building. I got a bit carried away here.

These were all taken an Tyneham and Worbarrow Bay in Dorset. The ruins are what’s left of a small village which was taken over by the army as a combat training zone in World War 2 with the promise to the villages and landowner that it would all be returned – it never was.

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Anyway, back to this film/developer combo. Well I can’t complain that it’s not grainy. What’s odd is how variable the appearance of the grain is. In some cases using the same exposure for different shots of the same subject produces markedly different grain, even though the negatives look fine. Shots with lots of mid-tones seem to show the most grain when normally exposed, highlights when overexposed are fine and shadows are fine too surprisingly though the darker greys are a bit ‘grungy’.

Apart from the first picture in this series, the rest of these are just what I was after so I’ll stick with this for a few more rolls. Oddly several shots earlier in the roll showed the same ultra graininess but all the subsequent shots had less obtrusive grain :-

Ilford Delta, Rodinal, Olympus OM2N

Another shot from earlier in the roll.

So – a few mysteries and mishaps, but I like this a lot (you may not!) and it’s good to finally find a film/dev combo which achieves the look I was after.

Hope you find this useful, thanks for looking!

p.s. There a reviews of lots of other films on the film, camera and lens review index tab.

 

A Quick Test – AgfaPhoto APX 400 Professional 35mm Film

Having used AgfaPhoto’s APX100 for a few years, it seemed a good idea to try the 400 ASA version as I haven’t used much film above 100 ASA for a while. I was wondering if a modern 400 ASA film might be good enough for occasional use, as winter in the UK has been pretty dark and cloudy. Here are the results from a roll shot ‘on and off’ over winter, shot on an Oly OM2N with a 28mm f2 lens and developed in ID11 for 10 minutes.

apx400_1

Shot on a flat, dull day in January, this is a good start – no post processing other than resizing, straight from the scanner. Not much of a challenge for DR though…

apx400_1bit

An enlargement from the centre left. This is much better than expected, and not much grainier than 100 ASA film.

Another dull overcast day at Worbarrow Bay after a storm had passed over – this looks quite grainy when resized, though not when viewed at full size which is odd. Still the ‘grainy look’ works quite well with this subject.

apx400_2

Physically the film canister is very well made, with a quality felt seal and a solid metal case. The film itself is a modern emulsion, and is easy to handle and process. It gathers hardly any dust and dries to a hard scratch resistant finish – all very reassuring.

Now for a proper subject to test with – the interior of Salisbury Cathedral. Very bright windows and dark shadows are something of a ‘torture test’. All shot on a 28mm f2 which is a bit soft wide open, but with exposures of 1/15th of a second meant any smaller aperture was out of the question.

apx400_4

This is very, very good – an excellent range of tones and a lovely rendering of brighter mid-tones. I really like this!

And another :-

apx400_5

Again a superb result with a wide range of tones. The sun was just coming out making the contrast between the windows and arches extreme.

All in all a very good result. This is a 400 ASA film which is almost indistinguishable from 100 ASA film, and it’s ability to capture a wide range of tones is impressive. I’ll certainly be ordering a few rolls for next winter and for occasional interior use. Highly recommended.

Thanks for looking!