Shooting Infrared

There’s a post on this blog about the techie side of shooting infrared here which goes through digital and film infrared techniques if you’re interested.

That’s just techie stuff though, so I thought you might want to see a few more infra red shots, mostly taken on a converted Fuji F810 digital compact using an R72 filter.

If you get into infrared, one irresistable subject is graveyards / cemeteries, and you’ll need a very strong will not to do it (I failed). Just to show that I did try some other subjects I’ll show those first!

This is a rare example of infrared photography producing a result which I’d aimed for. The black water is typical of infrared.

An infrared landscape, with a very dark sky contrasting with the lightened foliage.

I was surprised how dark the path of trodden grass was, but it’s the line of thorn bushes and sky which make the shot.

This is just odd! The bashed up lines of the gate and it’s shadow contrast nicely with the bright grass and tarmac, but other than that I don’t know why I like it!

This one’s shot on Efke IR film – now discontinued unfortunately – Rollei and Ilford still make IR film though. The long exposure had blurred the movement in the trees nicely. Yes it’s a church path so we’re edging closer to the inevitable!

Finding this metal grave marker in waving grass was a bit of a find though it’s a little soft as I tried a longer shutter speed without a tripod. The camera was a Sony R1 (unconverted).

This very ornate metal grave marker was surrounded by nice green foliage blowing around. I must have had a tripod this time. Sony R1 again.

A ‘classic’ IR graveyard shot – the vertical lines of the tall straight trees make this one as there’s nothing too unusual in white grass/black gravestone shots. Fuji F810.

If you avoid including foliage in the shot, sometimes the results look just like shooting with a deep red R25 filter on film – black skies emphasising the clouds. Fuji F810 again, lightly layered in Photoshop.

Same again but I wish I’d cloned out the street light in the lower left – I’ve just seen it. Fuji plus some layering.

So – hope you like them, and you’re inspired to get out there and shoot some infrared!

Comments, critique and questions always welcome.

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7 thoughts on “Shooting Infrared

  1. Some fantastic IR photos here! I haven’t tried to do IR digitally, I’ve only used film – Kodak Aerochrome for color infrared and Efke Aura / Ilford SFX for black and white. I got my hands on some expired Kodak HIE, but the shots didn’t turn out properly. They were grainy and underexposed. I’ve definitely had best results with Efke. It’s disheartening that they went out of business…

    • The Efke film was good (still got 3 rolls in the fridge) but the Rollei film is faster and a bit less tricky to handle after processing – Efke film attracts dust like crazy. With IR film though I’m always happy if I get anything useable! Thanks for the comment.

      • Yeah, I have a few rolls of Efke Aura saved as well. I bought about five rolls of the Rollei IR, but I haven’t shot with it at all yet. From what I understand, it doesn’t have quite the ‘blooming’ effect of other IR films. I agree, IR film can be tricky stuff! I too am always happy when I get a decent shot : )

      • Never really thought anything matched the Kodak HIE blooming effect. The closest I’ve got so far is to run it through the Photoshop ‘Diffuse Glow’ filter which is sort of the same – but not quite. Nice to see someone else shooting IR film!

  2. Wow – really inspiring shots… am new to the IR game, and feel like I have a lot to learn… the black water is really interesting and gives lots of ideas… 🙂

    • Thanks Tim. IR is very addictive – I ended up shooting only IR for months and had to force myself to leave the Fuji at home in the end to try and shoot something else. Looking forward to seeing your results.

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